Posted in Five Friday Happy Bringers

Five Friday Happy Bringers (4/27/12)

Friday, Friday!  Here’s what I’m happy about today:

1Breakfast this morning at a cool diner on Abercorn (here in Savannah), named–appropriately–The Diner on Abercorn.

2.  The following quote from one of my creative writing students this semester.  (Part of a reflection letter with one of the assignments.)

“I would recommend my friends take this class, but only my magical friends.  Not the dull, unimaginative type.”

3.  This invention from my just-turned-five grandson Daniel:

He calls it a Mouth Shutter.  Daniel explained it this way–“If somebody is talking or yelling, and you don’t want to listen to them anymore, put this on their mouth and they will shut up.”

Here’s the back of the Mouth Shutter, with tape for securing to the loud person’s mouth:

This makes SO much practical sense to me.

4.  This right-on-the-mark quote from the Abraham-Hicks folks:

“A very good career choice would be to gravitate toward those activities and to embrace those desires that harmonize with your core intentions, which are freedom and growth—and joy. Make a ‘career’ of living a  happy life rather than trying to find work that will produce enough income that  you can do things with your money that will then make you happy. When feeling  happy is of paramount importance to you—and what you do ‘for a living’ makes  you happy—you have found the best of all combinations.

5The promise of weekend.

HAVE A TERRIFIC ONE!

Posted in Joy in Nature, Savannah Joy

Earth Day 2012 — Reposted

Did last weekend’s Earth Day register in your world?  After talking to a number of folks so far this week, I saw that many were not aware of the special day which is dedicated to raising awareness of our most precious natural resource.  So I decided to repost my Earth Day post (silliness and all).

Since everyday should be Earth Day, here’s hoping you have a great EARTH WEDNESDAY with me!

One of the most FUN aspects of living in the beautiful city of Savannah GA is enJoying the wide variety of festivals and events celebrated in the city (Savannah Music festival, Jewish Food Festival, Asian Festival, that big green one in mid-March, etc.). Well yesterday heralded another great celebration–Earth Day 2012–held in Savannah’s living room, Forsyth Park.

Let’s be honest–so often we take this amazing planet for granted, like air, and forget that our Earth is alive–and continually giving us life. Indeed, our JOY as humans is inseparable from the health of our planet. I love the Native American proverb, “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.”

I hope you have been taking the time this week to reflect on the beauty and generosity of our planet–and to consider ways to make her healthier and happier.

Last Saturday morning, I arrived at Savannah’s Forsyth Park about eleven, and the place was already packed with Earth Day-ers. For some reason (which I should probably discuss with my therapist) I headed straight for the little alligator and the big owl.

Confession: I stopped at the next tent initially because I saw a book being prominently featured, Holy Sh**: Managing Manure to Save Mankind by Gene Logsdon. (Should I start using it as a text in my comp classes?) I met a very cool guy named Andy Schwartz, founder and compost chief of Grow.Eat.Repeat., a Savannah-based sustainability organization.

Check out his fascinating and encouraging website at www.grow-eat-repeat.com. Andy also has a blog, so we’re blog brothers!

Next I ran into my buddy, the always hip, happy and upbeat Ellie Covington. (I want Ellie to help me buy some hats.)

Still sort of meandering aimlessly around the park (a major life strategy of mine), I saw these girls wearing tutus and fresh from their 5K run. Sometimes I don’t ask questions–I just try to go with the flow.  (I noticed their breast cancer awareness ribbons, and then it hit me that they had participated in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.  I plan to run in it next year … or maybe walk.)

(I think they thought I was famous. I might have told them I was.)

Walking around a corner I literally bumped into Mrs. Helen Cobham who asked if I wanted to play a game and win some vegetable or flower seeds. (Actually I misunderstood and thought she said vegetables or flowers, not just seeds. And I don’t have a yard. But wanting to be nice on Earth Day and all, I thought, why not?) In the game I had to name at least two of earth’s cycles in order to win a prize.

Okay, now listen, let me tangent talk a bit and explain an issue I’ve had all my life. If someone asks me a question out of the blue, I go blank, like Lady Gaga at a beef gorging festival, or answer quickly and foolishly before thinking. For example, in the 8th grade by a MIRACLE OF GOD, I made it to the one-word final of the class spelling bee. I was given the word, “Georgia.” I knew I had won as I immediately jumped up and down and blurted out “J.E.O.R.G.I.A.”! Face beet red. But really, J and G are sort of alike.

Earth’s cycles? Hmmm. All I could think of was the word “motorcycle” at first and then the “cycle of life” and finally the “cycle of seasons,” which I knew HAD to be the right answer, so I yelled, “THE SEASONS!!,” like Oprah shrieking for her audience members to feel under their seats for a new Ipad. Helen looked at me with pity, and at the same time a man nudged me and pointed at the game poster board (I got the impression he thought HE was about to win a truckload of vegetables and wanted the competition gone). Looking at the board, I saw that the cycles (nitrogen, carbon, oxygen, etc.) were actually written in various sentences there. End result:

(Which, when all is said and done, makes me feel a little better about the spelling bee.)

Feeling on a winner’s high, I kept going, stopping in awe (really) at Elizabeth Conlon’s amazing display of herbs and vegetables growing from a tower planter device:

Take a look at Elizabeth’s tower gardens at www.elizabethc.towergarden.com.

Here I am with two fun and friendly bread and pasta makers:

One of my favorite stops was a short visit with gentle-spirited and wonderfully encouraging (as well as talented) Matthew Cooper and his didgeridoos, the grand instruments in the pics below.

Listen to his music at www.DreamtimeSynastry.com.

At one point I saw an empty tent booth, decided to take advantage of it, and offer a service of my own:

Oh, my service?

All I can say is I know a WHOLE lot of folks who are going to be sorry one of these days.

Seriously, I LOVED the message of the festival: let’s all take part in the loving care of our planet.

A hardworking fun group of eco-students from Savannah State:

Oh and I won the door prize!

(Helicopter rides available soon … with famous blogger.)

WHAT A HAPPY, HAPPY EARTH DAY!

P.S.  If I missed any vendor that I visited with, and you would like your info added, please share it in the comment section, and I will make amends.

For those who are interested, I’m including a wonderful poem, “Planet Earth.”

Planet Earth

It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet,
has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness;
and the hands keep on moving,
smoothing the holy surfaces.

‘In Praise of Ironing’, PABLO NERUDA

It has to be loved the way a laundress loves her linens,
the way she moves her hands caressing the fine muslins
knowing their warp and woof,
like a lover coaxing, or a mother praising.
It has to be loved as if it were embroidered
with flowers and birds and two joined hearts upon it.
It has to be stretched and stroked.
It has to be celebrated.
O this great beloved world and all the creatures in it.
It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet.

The trees must be washed, and the grasses and mosses.
They have to be polished as if made of green brass.
The rivers and little streams with their hidden cresses
and pale-coloured pebbles
and their fool’s gold
must be washed and starched or shined into brightness,
the sheets of lake water
smoothed with the hand
and the foam of the oceans pressed into neatness.
It has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness;

and pleated and goffered, the flower-blue sea
the protean, wine-dark, grey, green, sea
with its metres of satin and bolts of brocade.
And sky – such an O! overhead – night and day
must be burnished and rubbed
by hands that are loving
so the blue blazons forth
and the stars keep on shining
within and above
and the hands keep on moving.

It has to be made bright, the skin of this planet
till it shines in the sun like gold leaf.
Archangels then will attend to its metals
and polish the rods of its rain.
Seraphim will stop singing hosannas
to shower it with blessings and blisses and praises
and, newly in love,
we must draw it and paint it
our pencils and brushes and loving caresses
smoothing the holy surfaces.

From Planet Earth: Poems Selected and New, by P.K. Page
Copyright © P.K. Page, 2002

You can also hear the poet read her work:

Posted in Breaking News, Joy in Nature, Savannah Joy

Happy Earth Day 2012 — Part Two

One of the most FUN aspects of living in the beautiful city of Savannah GA is enJoying the wide variety of festivals and events celebrated in the city (Savannah Music festival, Jewish Food Festival, Asian Festival, that big green one in mid-March, etc.). Well yesterday heralded another great celebration–Earth Day 2012–held in Savannah’s living room, Forsyth Park.

Let’s be honest–so often we take this amazing planet for granted, like air, and forget that our Earth is alive–and continually giving us life. Indeed, our JOY as humans is inseparable from the health of our planet. I love the Native American proverb, “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.”

I hope you take the time this week to reflect on the beauty and generosity of our planet–and to consider ways to make her healthier and happier.

Yesterday morning, I arrived at Savannah’s Forsyth Park about eleven, and the place was already packed with Earth Day-ers. For some reason (which I should probably discuss with my therapist) I headed straight for the little alligator and the big owl.

Confession: I stopped at the next tent initially because I saw a book being prominently featured, Holy Sh**: Managing Manure to Save Mankind by Gene Logsdon. (Should I start using it as a text in my comp classes?) I met a very cool guy named Andy Schwartz, founder and compost chief of Grow.Eat.Repeat., a Savannah-based sustainability organization.

Check out his fascinating and encouraging website at www.grow-eat-repeat.com. Andy also has a blog, so we’re blog brothers!

Next I ran into my buddy, the always hip, happy and upbeat Ellie Covington. (I want Ellie to help me buy some hats.)

Still sort of meandering aimlessly around the park (a major life strategy of mine), I saw these girls wearing tutus and fresh from their 5K run. Sometimes I don’t ask questions–I just try to go with the flow.  (I noticed their breast cancer awareness ribbons, and then it hit me that they had participated in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.  I plan to run in it next year … or maybe walk.)

(I think they thought I was famous. I might have told them I was.)

Walking around a corner I literally bumped into Mrs. Helen Cobham who asked if I wanted to play a game and win some vegetable or flower seeds. (Actually I misunderstood and thought she said vegetables or flowers, not just seeds. And I don’t have a yard. But wanting to be nice on Earth Day and all, I thought, why not?) In the game I had to name at least two of earth’s cycles in order to win a prize.

Okay, now listen, let me tangent talk a bit and explain an issue I’ve had all my life. If someone asks me a question out of the blue, I go blank, like Lady Gaga at a beef gorging festival, or answer quickly and foolishly before thinking. For example, in the 8th grade by a MIRACLE OF GOD, I made it to the one-word final of the class spelling bee. I was given the word, “Georgia.” I knew I had won as I immediately jumped up and down and blurted out “J.E.O.R.G.I.A.”! Face beet red. But really, J and G are sort of alike.

Earth’s cycles? Hmmm. All I could think of was the word “motorcycle” at first and then the “cycle of life” and finally the “cycle of seasons,” which I knew HAD to be the right answer, so I yelled, “THE SEASONS!!,” like Oprah shrieking for her audience members to feel under their seats for a new Ipad. Helen looked at me with pity, and at the same time a man nudged me and pointed at the game poster board (I got the impression he thought HE was about to win a truckload of vegetables and wanted the competition gone). Looking at the board, I saw that the cycles (nitrogen, carbon, oxygen, etc.) were actually written in various sentences there. End result:

(Which, when all is said and done, makes me feel a little better about the spelling bee.)

Feeling on a winner’s high, I kept going, stopping in awe (really) at Elizabeth Conlon’s amazing display of herbs and vegetables growing from a tower planter device:

Take a look at Elizabeth’s tower gardens at www.elizabethc.towergarden.com.

Here I am with two fun and friendly bread and pasta makers:

One of my favorite stops was a short visit with gentle-spirited and wonderfully encouraging (as well as talented) Matthew Cooper and his didgeridoos, the grand instruments in the pics below.

Listen to his music at www.DreamtimeSynastry.com.

At one point I saw an empty tent booth, decided to take advantage of it, and offer a service of my own:

Oh, my service?

All I can say is I know a WHOLE lot of folks who are going to be sorry one of these days.

Seriously, I LOVED the message of the festival: let’s all take part in the loving care of our planet.

A hardworking fun group of eco-students from Savannah State:

Oh and I won the door prize!

(Helicopter rides available soon … with famous blogger.)

WHAT A HAPPY, HAPPY EARTH DAY!

P.S.  If I missed any vendor that I visited with, and you would like your info added, please share it in the comment section, and I will make amends.

For those who are interested, I’m including a wonderful poem, “Planet Earth.”

Planet Earth

It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet,
has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness;
and the hands keep on moving,
smoothing the holy surfaces.

‘In Praise of Ironing’, PABLO NERUDA

It has to be loved the way a laundress loves her linens,
the way she moves her hands caressing the fine muslins
knowing their warp and woof,
like a lover coaxing, or a mother praising.
It has to be loved as if it were embroidered
with flowers and birds and two joined hearts upon it.
It has to be stretched and stroked.
It has to be celebrated.
O this great beloved world and all the creatures in it.
It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet.

The trees must be washed, and the grasses and mosses.
They have to be polished as if made of green brass.
The rivers and little streams with their hidden cresses
and pale-coloured pebbles
and their fool’s gold
must be washed and starched or shined into brightness,
the sheets of lake water
smoothed with the hand
and the foam of the oceans pressed into neatness.
It has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness;

and pleated and goffered, the flower-blue sea
the protean, wine-dark, grey, green, sea
with its metres of satin and bolts of brocade.
And sky – such an O! overhead – night and day
must be burnished and rubbed
by hands that are loving
so the blue blazons forth
and the stars keep on shining
within and above
and the hands keep on moving.

It has to be made bright, the skin of this planet
till it shines in the sun like gold leaf.
Archangels then will attend to its metals
and polish the rods of its rain.
Seraphim will stop singing hosannas
to shower it with blessings and blisses and praises
and, newly in love,
we must draw it and paint it
our pencils and brushes and loving caresses
smoothing the holy surfaces.

From Planet Earth: Poems Selected and New, by P.K. Page
Copyright © P.K. Page, 2002

You can also hear the poet read her work:

Posted in Five Friday Happy Bringers, Savannah Joy

Five Friday Happy Bringers (4/20/12)

Friday! Five Things:

 

1. Rainbows. I saw this double rainbow on my way home from work from Statesboro to Savannah.

2. Elephant Ears. (There’s a long true story here involving New Orleans, Cafe Du Monde, a fortune teller and late night. But that’s for another post.)

3. Learning how to be happier. And taking voluntary steps toward that goal.

 

 

4. Chilling out at Chili’s. Last night I went to Chili’s for those spicy chicken crispers (yum).

 

 

The visit was made more fun by running into Tiffani, a Chili’s worker extraordinaire (whom I had not seen in quite a while). Tiffani ALWAYS has a smile and a laugh. She radiates happiness. Here she is (and of course I had to give her a blog card).

 

 

Go Tiffani!

5. Being able to breathe deeply and feel the essence of life flowing in and out of my body.

HAPPY WEEKEND TO YOU ALL!

 

Posted in JoyInciters

JoyInciter #3 — The Happiness Box

So far I have introduced two wonderfully effective strategies for increasing the frequency and intensity of happiness in our lives: JoyInciter #1–the Thanksgiving Book and JoyInciter #2–the Walking Into strategy. Are you practicing with either of them? The third JoyInciter–the Happiness Box– is both fun and transformationally creative. Let’s talk about it.

Recently I (along with Mr. Happy) presented a workshop for the Georgia Southern Writing Project and The Thinking and Learning Institute at City Campus in downtown Statesboro. (Gosh, that’s a mouthful.) (By the way, City Campus is a very cool entrepreneurial outreach of Georgia Southern.) This workshop, titled “Happiness in a Box,” is based on today’s third JoyInciter.

(Am I too old to wear that shirt? That VITAL question just occurred to me.)

(June Joyner, the Director of the GSU Writing Project, Mr. Happy and Yours Truly)

Before we discuss the “how” of the Happiness Box, let’s briefly examine two “why’s.” First, theoretically speaking, that which we consistently place our “gaze” upon, we will SEE in our world, in our reality. (And all our realities are in constant morph mode, depending on where and how long we place our “mindsight.”) My school, Georgia Southern, for example, is a party school for those who choose to see it in that light. However, GSU is a rigorous academic institution for eyes which view it from that perspective. I suggest to you (and what I’m about to say is the HEART of this blog) that we need to take great care about where we place our consistent, ongoing attention.

The second Happiness Box “why” is childlike and fundamental: making and maintaining this box is FUN and makes one happier, more excited, hopeful, and expectant of good.

To start, find a shoebox-sized box. You can choose to decorate it if you like, but at least write a Statement of Intention on the box somewhere. Here’s one of my Happiness Boxes:

And my Statement of Intention (written on the underside of the box cover) is simple: “The contents of this box make me happy.”

Next, go through magazines, brochures, newspapers, etc. and find pictures of that which gives you joy. Anything. I suggest that you DO NOT worry about trying to organize or structure this process–have fun with it. Look for pictures, colors, words, abstractions that “light you up” in some way. Cut them out and put them in your box. Also look for photos, little items, paint samples, memorabilia which cause your heart to sing. You have thus started the Happiness Box strategy.

Keep adding to your box, and from time to time, empty it onto your dining room table or your bed or floor. Look at all that you have accumulated. If you are like most of my students (and me), you will see categories of happiness begin to emerge: family, material desires, spirituality, food, goals, accomplishments, hobbies, memories, sports, pets, etc.

The more you add to your happiness box, the greater the sense of joy and expectation. A wonderful added benefit is that by creating the box, you begin to get CLEARER about that which you really want. It’s so much fun to look through your accumulated desires.

Here are some workshop participants working on their boxes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here are some Happiness Boxes from students in my English Composition II classes this semester:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Amanda Hedrick and Mr. Happy at the workshop.)

So there it is, JoyInciter #3, The Happiness Box. I urge you to make one for yourself, and begin to get clearer about what makes you joyful and exuberant.

(P.S. In my classoes at school, there are various writing prompts and assignments connected to this project.)

 

Posted in Savannah Joy

Tybee or Not Tybee?

Sunday has always been a mixed-blessing day to me. I realize that technically (at least from the Christian church perspective) Sunday is the BEGINNING of the new week, right? But let’s be honest–doesn’t it really feel more like the end? Right now it’s 8:58 p.m., and little tears are beginning to form in my eyes because the weekend is at its close.

BUT WHAT A GRAND SUNDAY I HAD!

First, I slept in and walked to J. Christopher’s for an interesting-looking and delicious-tasting breakfast, their spinach-bacon skillet:

Capital Y Yum. (But seriously, does it look more like a skeleton, a rabbit or Mickey Mouse to you? I couldn’t decide.)

Now this next part is bad, and you will probably judge me and call me mean names, such as “heathen” and “reprobate,” but I decided to skip my usual Sunday morning church attendance today. I’m not sure why. Instead, feeling aromatic, I wandered around Savannah’s historic district and smelled gardens. Then I drove to Tybee Island to smell the salt watery beach. (Part of the reasoning here went something like this: “Walking beside the ocean waves and breathing deeply will be like having a gigantic Neti Pot working on my allergies.” I’m so good at affirmations now that I can come up with one to justify ’bout anything: “This maple frosted Dunkin Donuts donut is a warm, joyful nugget of golden comfort and love.” )

When I crossed the bridge onto the island and got to the light at Chu’s, something told me (I like how “something told me” sounds–as if I’m a big-time metaphysical) to turn left and go to the lighthouse. So I did. The rest of today’s post will be primarily visual, with few commercial interruptions–just an occassional/explanatory/superfluous note.

I don’t know what made me want to fire upon the lighthouse. But after being told to leave the property, I RAN down to the beach, rolled up my jeans, (Isn’t that supposed to be cool? If so, why was I the ONLY one on the beach with long pants, and why didn’t it occur to me to wear something like, I don’t know, a bathing suit?!) and pretended to be a famous blogger looking for material.

Here I am standing on a rock. Remember, Sunday is a slow news day.

And here I am posing with a beautiful couple, Tamara and Pernell, that I ran into (okay, interrupted) as they were being photographed in various spots along the gorgeous, sparkling beach.

All in all a really fun afternoon at the ocean.

Posted in Five Friday Happy Bringers, Savannah Joy

Five Friday Happy Bringers (4/13/12)

Hey, hey, it’s wonderful Friday once again, and here are Five Things I’m happy about:

1. Today, enjoying so much a great lunchtime experience at Back in the Day Bakery on Bull Street in Savannah. I’ve eaten there before (oh gosh, their cupcakes!) but noon today was especially fun and scrumptious. I ordered the meaty State Fair sandwich, two lavender cookies (yes, lavender) and sweet tea. While at the counter, I noticed a brand new Back in the Day Bakery Cookbook and learned that the owners are on a book tour and will be appearing on Martha Stewart on Monday. (I want to appear on Martha Stewart.)

Here’s cool and hip Stephanie serving the State Fair:

And here’s Stephanie with a couple of beautiful co-workers in front of the new cookbook:

2. Appreciating smart people who can do amazing feats like build bridges. The old drawbridge leading onto Skidaway Island was up when I drove out to visit my daughter this afternoon. A brand new TALL bridge is being built. You can see part of it in this pic I took from my car.

I just find it so amazing that the bridge is going up because of ideas and plans and drawings made by women and men. I need to be smarter.

3. We found out this week that Emily’s twins are one of each–a boy and a girl!

4. The excitement of the promise and newness of springtime.

5. Play

 

Have a good tasting, smart, twin-sized, playful, spring weekend!

 

Posted in Five Friday Happy Bringers, Humor

Five Friday Happy Bringers (4/6/12)

It’s Friday, and even though it has been a couple of weeks since I posted the Happy Bringers, here’s what I’m happy about today:

1.  But before I tell you the first happy bringer, I have a confession.  Gather ’round.  For the past two weeks I have been without my laptop because it bit the byte.  I took it to a computer guy who had the nerve to say I should just throw the piece of junk away.  That really hurt my feelings, but he was right.  So anyway, I have been writing my posts from my iPhone (at least one person needs to tell me, with exclamation, what a grand job I’ve been doing).  By the way, back in February I was at a writing conference, and a presenter explained that one of her students (I think he was a SCAD Atlanta kid, probably with too much money, metallic blue hair on the left side of his head, pipe cleaner jeans and a smirk) wrote an ENTIRE ten-page research paper, complete with documentation ON HIS SMART PHONE.  Me, I have trouble simply texting because my fingers are so fat, and I’m always hitting an adjacent key and ending up with weird combinations of letters which Autocorrect then “corrects” into albeit correctly spelled words, buts ones which are NOT the ones I meant and are often grossly inappropriate, as if I use UrbanDictionary as my thesaurus.  And to make matters worse, I always seem to hit Send at the exact moment I decide to look at the screen for a too-late proofing.  (Me: “Yes, I think you shod bug that booty you’ve been wanting to read.”  Them: “Huh?  Neal, is this you?  What’s going on?  Where are you?”)

The first happy bringer, then, is that I have a new computer, which I took out of the box maybe an hour ago.  The coolest perk is that the keyboard has backlighting.  I haven’t figured out why or what good that is, but like my solid white tie, I’m glad I have it.

2.  So, still on the computer idea, my second happy bringer is my daughter and son-in-law who bought the new computer for me as a gift  (thank you!).  As I have gotten a bit older, I’ve developed this amazing strategy concerning the acquisition of goods and services: “Pout and Mope.”  (For this part of today’s post, please pretend you’re not reading a blog about happiness.  Pretend instead you’re reading a blog about, say, mental instability or the Kardashians.)  Pout and Mope works like this:  If I want something but can’t quite decide whether to buy it or not, or if I simply don’t want to pay for it, I quickly brainstorm strategies for getting myself sort of down emotionally.  To get in this fake-depressed state, I think about, I don’t know, Glenn Beck, or something.  Then I hang out where I think people will feel sorry for me and perhaps buy me what I want.  This works REALLY well if there are such folks at Best Buy, Haverty’s, Diamond Imporium or the Apple Store.

For example, for days I complained and moped that I didn’t have a computer to write my blog on (or to surf the web to “learn more about Jesus,” I added, since I thought that might get me a few nearing-Easter points) AND that my eyes were getting in pretty rough shape from having to squint so much with the iPhone blog posting AND also that I’m sure not getting any younger AND we should all do good for others while they’re still alive.  And then, WHAM!  A week later I’m writing on a lighted keyboard.

Moral of story:  If you see me on the street, and your first reaction is “Oh my gosh, WHAT could be wrong with him?!,” just buy me something.  Thank you.

3.  Making fun of Riboclavin.  You remember my hypochondriac buddy, right?  Every time he thinks he has a slight fever, in his mind he’s dead as a doornail.  Well, I regret to inform you that the mental deficiency has spread to Mrdillharris … HIS DOG.  Just look below; it’s so sad how people can sink to such depths.  (If you haven’t read Happy Bringer #2 above, don’t.)  The first pic is somewhat normal, a cute dog.  The second, well you be the judge.

I just don’t know what to do.  No clue.

4.  Allegra D

5.  Appreciating the Savannah iDoctor.  A while back, while simultaneously walking down the concrete steps just outside my second floor office at Georgia Southern AND checking my texts, I saw it happen a millisecond before it happened.  My phone slipped from my fingers (what caused that??) and flipped twice before crashing onto the first step below, then bouncing like a slinky onto the second, then the third.  Picking it up, Humpty Dumpty-ish, the face was, of course shattered.  I had a hip but thin case at the time.  I wanted to hurt or flunk somebody but instead called Apple who said via recording to send the phone in and expect a two-week return time and a large bill.  Riboclavin (from above–he comes in handy occasionally) told me about the Savannah iDoctor, who specializes in fixing iPhones broken by klutzes.  I was amazed: I dropped it off on Wilmington Island at 9 am, grabbed a sausage-egg biscuit and returned forty-five minutes later to find a brand-new-looking phone and a bill half what Apple asked.  (And a recommendation to get an Otterbox.)

Check Eric out if you need similar help:  www.SavannahiDoctor.com

Have a wonderfully fun and joyful weekend and Easter!